Mixed Martial Arts, Muay Thai and Tai Chi Class Schedule - Kogan Self-Defense

Monday

  • Hapkido and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) - Kids (10-14)Everyone wants their kids to have confidence, self-discipline and composure during life's challenging moments. In a world where video games and smartphones have largely replaced outdoor play and sports activities, martial arts not only encourages physical activity but also fine-tunes it to optimize overall health and well-being; optimal fitness can lead to lowered risk of chronic health conditions in childhood and even later in life. Our kid-friendly, experienced instructors approach training with compassion, physical fitness, endurance and strength to encourage a lifetime of balance and well-being. Borrowing its techniques from several disciplines such as karate, jujitsu, judo and aikido, mixed martial arts is a sport with few rules but many elements. Designed to produce warriors who excel in the art of combat as well as self-defense, mixed martial arts is not for the faint of heart; it is a fierce challenge that stretches the limits of mind and body. Our mixed martial arts classes provide a comprehensive and challenging physical workout and a lot of fun for kids. They give your kid the skills to defend effectively in a variety of situations while also building self-discipline and the confidence to face life head-on. We believe martial arts classes should be fun; our professionals provide an encouraging, positive environment for children to learn and grow. Class Schedule with Mikhail KoganMikhail is a Grand Master in Hapkido, State Director in Hapkido-GHA, Grand Master in WUCAA Combat Free Fight, Grand Master & Founder of Spetsnaz USA DART, 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung Fu, and 6th Degree Black Belt in Cruchalo.

    Certifications:

    • Grand Master in Marshal Arts (WUCAA)
    • 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung-Fu
    • Crushalo-Choy 6th Degree Black Belt
    • Turando 5 Degree Back Belt
    • Grand Master Hapkido
    • U.S.S.R. Master of Sport in Combat Sambo
    6:00 pm to 7:30 pm
  • Hapkido and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) - All AgesHapkido (also spelled hap ki do or hapki-do; Hangul: 합기도; Hanja: 合氣道) is a dynamic and highly eclectic Korean martial art. It is a form of self-defense that employs joint locks, grappling and throwing techniques of other martial arts, as well as kicks, punches, and other striking attacks. There is also the use of traditional weapons, including knife, sword, rope, jool bong (nunchaku), cane, short stick (dan bong), and middle-length staff (joong bong, gun, bō (Japanese)) which vary in emphasis depending on the particular tradition examined. Hapkido contains both long- and close-range fighting techniques, utilizing jumping kicks and percussive hand strikes at longer ranges and pressure point strikes, joint locks, or throws at closer fighting distances. Hapkido emphasizes circular motion, redirection of force, and control of the opponent. Practitioners seek to gain advantage through footwork and body positioning to incorporate the use of leverage, avoiding the use of strength against strength. The art adapted from Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu (大東流合気柔術) as it was taught by Choi Yong-Sool (Hangul: 최용술) when he returned to Korea after World War II, having lived in Japan for 30 years. This system was later combined with kicking and striking techniques of indigenous and contemporary arts such as taekkyeon, as well as throwing techniques and ground fighting from Japanese judo. Its history is obscured by the historical animosity between the Korean and Japanese people following the Second World War. Class Schedule with Mikhail KoganMikhail is a Grand Master in Hapkido, State Director in Hapkido-GHA, Grand Master in WUCAA Combat Free Fight, Grand Master & Founder of Spetsnaz USA DART, 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung Fu, and 6th Degree Black Belt in Cruchalo.

    Certifications:

    • Grand Master in Marshal Arts (WUCAA)
    • 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung-Fu
    • Crushalo-Choy 6th Degree Black Belt
    • Turando 5 Degree Back Belt
    • Grand Master Hapkido
    • U.S.S.R. Master of Sport in Combat Sambo
    7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
  • Muay Thai and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) - Adults

    Mixed Martial Arts

    Whether you want to be involved in competitive fighting, or you just want to maximize your physical fitness, endurance and strength, mixed martial arts may be right for you. Borrowing its techniques from several disciplines such as karate, jujitsu, judo and aikido, mixed martial arts is a sport with few rules but many elements. Designed to produce warriors who excel in the art of combat as well as self-defense, mixed martial arts is not for the faint of heart; it is a fierce challenge that stretches the limits of mind and body. Our mixed martial arts classes provide a comprehensive and challenging physical workout. They give you the skills to defend yourself effectively in a variety of situations while also building self-discipline and the confidence to face life head-on. If you live a complicated lifestyle, mixed martial arts can prove to be an indispensable source of stress relief. Our experienced and talented instructors can help you change your life through the ancient principles of physical and mental balance. To improve your self-esteem and attain the strong body of your dreams, sign up for our professional mixed martial arts classes now.

    Muay Thai

    Also known as Thai kickboxing, Muay Thai is a national sport of Thailand and a great passion for many martial arts experts. Muay Thai is considered by many to be the ultimate form of hand-to-hand combat. Using the science of eight limbs, the vigorous combat sport utilizes knees and elbows along with kicks and punches; almost any part of the body is a possible target, and any body part except the head may be used to strike one's opponent. Muay Thai is a professional and an amateur sport, a martial art and a powerful form of self-protection passed down through the centuries. Learning the ancient art of Muay Thai has a variety of benefits in addition to valuable self-defense skills. It builds up core strength and agility and increases overall good shape. Muay Thai also bolsters self-esteem and confidence and teaches discipline, courage and determination. By harnessing the power of the will, it also helps lower stress levels and encourages balanced living. Our Muay Thai classes are taught by highly trained, experienced instructors who support their students every step of the way. Discover your true potential through Muay Thai classes today. Class Schedule
    with Alex LavrentevAlex is USSR Champion in Kickboxing, He also has years of performing, practicing and teaching Muay Thai and Shotokan Karate.   7:30 pm to 9:30 pm

Tuesday

  • Kung Fu - Kids (10-14)Kung Fu is a general reference to the martial arts of China. It originated in the Shaolin Temple where it was practiced by monks for health and self-defense. Kung Fu is a great cardiovascular and muscle-toning workout that improves overall health and physical well-being. It utilizes every part of your body in concert with your mind to attain strength, balance, endurance, energy and focus. Kung Fu training can minimize the effects of a sedentary lifestyle and encourage to live healthier by giving more awareness of the state of your body and mind. If your kid lack the confidence to protect himself when approached by a potential attacker, Kung Fu gives you valuable self-defense skills that will keep you safer and more engaged in life. Our experienced, qualified Kung Fu instructors can support and guide your kid through the process of becoming more confident and able to handle the stresses of life with the composure of a martial arts master. Class Schedule with Elena KadigrovaElena Kadigrova is 5 times European Champion. She is a World Medalist in Kung Fu, in Forms, Weapons and Sparring. Elena is a Black belt in a Combat Kung Fu. She also has more than 10 years of teaching and training Kung Fu, Forms with Weapons and Sparring for all ages in the United States. Prior to coming to US Elena was for 4 years a Wushu Teacher at the Children’s Sport School (Berdyansk, Ukraine). She was Awarded a rank of the “International Degree Athlete in Wushu” by Ministry of Culture and Sport of the Ukraine.

    Ranking:

    • Member of National Ukrainian Wushu Taolu Team from 1991 to 2000.
    • Bronze medalist at World Wushu Championship in Women’s Gunshu (Cudgel) Baltimore (USA-1995).
    • 1st place in Women’s Duilian (Set Sparing) at European Wushu Cup Moscow (Russia-1993).
    • 1st place in Women’s Chanquan (Long fist), Jianshu (Straight sword), Duilian (Set Sparing) and Traditional Fist at European Wushu Cup Istanbul (Turkey-1995).
    • 1st place in a Women’s Taolu Program at International Wushu Championship Cairo (Egypt-1995).
    • 1st place in a Women’s Traditional Weapon at European Wushu Championship Rome (Italy-1996).
    • 1st place in Women’s Chanquan (Long fist), Jianshu (Straight sword) in European Wushu Championship (Greece-1998).
    • 1st place in Women’s Taolu Program at International Wushu Cup Bergamo (Italy-1998).
    • 1st places in Women’s Individual Taolu Program at National Ukrainian Wushu Competitions 1991-2000
    5:00 pm to 6:30 pm
  • Kung Fu - Kids (5-10)Everyone wants their kids to have confidence, self-discipline and composure during life's challenging moments. The ancient martial arts can deliver the tools your children need to develop these traits. Kung Fu builds character by teaching the value of respect, effort and focus. It emphasizes goal-setting, rank, achievement and self-improvement. Children who are well-trained in martial arts can defend themselves against predators like bullies, and they feel more comfortable in social situations. In a world where video games and smartphones have largely replaced outdoor play and sports activities, Kung Fu not only encourages physical activity but also fine-tunes it to optimize overall health and well-being; optimal fitness can lead to lowered risk of chronic health conditions in childhood and even later in life. Our kid-friendly, experienced instructors approach training with compassion, strength and wisdom to encourage a lifetime of balance and well-being. We believe Kung Fu classes should be fun; our professionals provide an encouraging, positive environment for children to learn and grow. Give your children the lifelong benefits of Kung Fu training by signing up for our professional classes today. Class Schedule with Elena KadigrovaElena Kadigrova is 5 times European Champion. She is a World Medalist in Kung Fu, in Forms, Weapons and Sparring. Elena is a Black belt in a Combat Kung Fu. She also has more than 10 years of teaching and training Kung Fu, Forms with Weapons and Sparring for all ages in the United States. Prior to coming to US Elena was for 4 years a Wushu Teacher at the Children’s Sport School (Berdyansk, Ukraine). She was Awarded a rank of the “International Degree Athlete in Wushu” by Ministry of Culture and Sport of the Ukraine.

    Ranking:

    • Member of National Ukrainian Wushu Taolu Team from 1991 to 2000.
    • Bronze medalist at World Wushu Championship in Women’s Gunshu (Cudgel) Baltimore (USA-1995).
    • 1st place in Women’s Duilian (Set Sparing) at European Wushu Cup Moscow (Russia-1993).
    • 1st place in Women’s Chanquan (Long fist), Jianshu (Straight sword), Duilian (Set Sparing) and Traditional Fist at European Wushu Cup Istanbul (Turkey-1995).
    • 1st place in a Women’s Taolu Program at International Wushu Championship Cairo (Egypt-1995).
    • 1st place in a Women’s Traditional Weapon at European Wushu Championship Rome (Italy-1996).
    • 1st place in Women’s Chanquan (Long fist), Jianshu (Straight sword) in European Wushu Championship (Greece-1998).
    • 1st place in Women’s Taolu Program at International Wushu Cup Bergamo (Italy-1998).
    • 1st places in Women’s Individual Taolu Program at National Ukrainian Wushu Competitions 1991-2000
    6:30 pm to 8:00 pm
  • Kyokushin and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) – All Ages Masutatsu (Mas) Oyama was born Yong I-Choi on the 27th of July, 1923, in a village not far from Gunsan in Southern Korea. At a relatively young age he was sent to Manchuria, in Southern China, to live on his sister's farm. At the age of nine, he started studying the Southern Chinese form of Kempo called Eighteen hands from a Mr. Yi who was at the time working on the farm. When Oyama returned to Korea at the age of 12, he continued his training in Korean Kempo. In 1938, at the age of 15, he travelled to Japan to train as an aviator, to be like his hero of the time, Korea's first fighter pilot. Survival on his own at that age proved to be more difficult than he thought, especially as a Korean in Japan, and the aviator training fell by the wayside. Gichin Funakoshi He did however continue martial arts training, by participating in judo and boxing, and one day he noticed some students training in Okinawan Karate. This interested him very much and he went to train at the dojo of Gichin Funakoshi at Takushoku University, where he learned what is today known as CyberDojo home pages. His training progress was such that by the age of seventeen he was already a 2nd dan, and by the time he entered the Japanese Imperial Army at 20, he was a fourth dan. At this point he also took a serious interest in judo, and his progress there was no less amazing. By the time he had quit training in Judo. So Nei Chu The defeat of Japan and the subsequent indignity of Occupation almost proved to be too much for Mas Oyama, who nearly despaired. Fortunately for all of us, So Nei Chu came into his life at that time. Master So, another Korean (from Oyama's own province) living in Japan, was one of the highest authorities on Goju Ryu in Japan at the time. He was renowned for both his physical and spiritual strength. It was he who encouraged Mas Oyama to dedicate his life to the Martial Way. It was he too who suggested that Oyama should retreat away from the rest of the world for 3 years while training his mind and body. Mountain Training When he was 23 years old, Mas Oyama met Eiji Yoshikawa, the author of the novel Musashi, which was based on the life and exploits of Japan's most famous Samurai. Both the novel and the author helped to teach Mas Oyama about the Samurai Bushido code and what it meant. That same year, Oyama went to Mt. Minobu in the Chiba Prefecture, where Musashi had developed his Nito-Ryu style of sword fighting. Oyama thought that this would be an appropriate place to commence the rigorous of training he had planned for himself. Among the things he took with him was a copy of Yoshikawa's book. A student named Yashiro also came with him. The relative solitude was strongly felt, and after 6 months, Yashiro secretly fled during the night. It became even harder for Oyama, who wanted more than ever to return to civilization. So Nei Chu wrote to him that he should shave off an eyebrow in order to get rid of the urge. Surely he wouldn't want anyone to see him that way! This and other more moving words convinced Oyama to continue, and he resolved to become the most powerful karate-ka in Japan. Soon however, his sponsor informed him that he was no longer able to support him and so, after fourteen months, he had to end his solitude. Mas Oyama Makiwara A few months later, in 1947, Mas Oyama won the karate section of the first Japanese National Martial Arts Championships after WWII. However, he still felt empty for not having completed the three years of solitude. He then decided to dedicate his life completely to karate-do. So he started again, this time on Mt. Kiyozumi, also in Chiba Prefecture. This site he chose for its spiritually uplifting environment. This time his training was fanatical — 12 hours a day every day with no rest days, standing under (cold) buffeting waterfalls, breaking river stones with his hands, using trees as makiwara, jumping over rapidly growing flax plants hundreds of times each day. Each day also included a period of study of the ancients classics on the Martial arts, Zen, and philosophy. After eighteen months he came down fully confident of himself, and able to take control of his life. Never again would he be so heavily influenced by his society around him. (Though it is probably safe to say that his circumstances were also probably never again as traumatic!) Bulls, Challengers, and the Godhand In 1950, Sosai (the founder) Mas Oyama started testing (and demonstrating) his power by fighting bulls. In all, he fought 52 bulls, three of which were killed instantly, and 49 had their horns taken off with knife hand blows. That it is not to say that it was all that easy for him. Oyama was fond of remembering that his first attempt just resulted in an angry bull. In 1957, at the age of 34, he was nearly killed in Mexico when a bull got some of his own back and gored him. Oyama somehow managed to pull the bull off and break off his horn. He was bedridden for 6 months while he recovered from the usually fatal wound. Today of course, the animal rights groups would have something to say about these demonstrations, despite the fact that the animals were already all destined for slaughter. In 1952, he travelled the United States for a year, demonstrating his karate live and on national television. During subsequent years, he took on all challengers, resulting in fights with 270 different people. The vast majority of these were defeated with one punch! A fight never lasted more than three minutes, and most rarely lasted more than a few seconds. His fighting principle was simple — if he got through to you, that was it. If he hit you, you broke. If you blocked a rib punch, you arm was broken or dislocated. If you didn't block, your rib was broken. He became known as the Godhand, a living manifestation of the Japanese warriors' maxim Ichi geki, Hissatsu or "One strike, certain death". To him, this was the true aim of technique in karate. The fancy footwork and intricate techniques were secondary (though he was also known for the power of his head kicks). It was during one of his visits to the United States that Mas Oyama met Jacques Sandulescu, a big (190 cm and 190 kg of muscle) Romanian who had been taken prisoner by the Red Army at the age of 16, and sent to the coal mines as a slave laborer for two years. They quickly became friends and remained so for the rest of Oyama's life, and Jacques still trains and acts as advisor to the IKO(1) to this day. Oyama Dojo In 1953, Mas Oyama opened his first "Dojo", a grass lot in Mejiro in Tokyo. In 1956, the first real Dojo was opened in a former ballet studio behind Rikkyo University, 500 meters from the location of the current Japanese honbu dojo (headquarters). By 1957 there were 700 members, despite the high drop-out rate due to the harshness of training. Practitioners of other styles came to train here too, for the jis-sen kumite (full contact fighting). One of the original instructors, Kenji Kato, has said that they would observe those from other styles, and adopt any techniques that "would be good in a real fight". This was how Mas Oyama's karate evolved. He took techniques from all martial arts, and did not restrict himself to karate alone. The Oyama Dojo members took their kumite seriously, seeing it primarily as a fighting art, so they expected to hit and to be hit. With few restrictions, attacking the head was common, usually with the palm heel or towel-wrapped knuckles. Grabs, throws, and groin attacks were also common. Kumite rounds would continue till one person loudly conceded defeat. Injuries occurred on a daily basis and the drop out rate was high (over 90%). They had no official do-gi and wore whatever they had. Bobby Lowe In 1952, Mas Oyama gave a demonstration in Hawaii. A young Bobby Lowe saw him and was stunned by the power Oyama demonstrated. It was not as though Bobby Lowe was inexperienced in martial arts. Though still quite young, his achievements to date were not much less than those of Mas Oyama himself. His father had been a Kung Fu instructor, and he had participated in any fighting art he could find. By the age of 23, he was yondan in judo, nidan in kempo, shodan in aikido, and a highly regarded welterweight boxer. It was not long before Bobby Lowe became the first Kyokushin uchi deshi or "live-in student" of Mas Oyama's. He trained daily with Mas Oyama for one and a half years. Eventually, an uchi deshi's time became "1000 days for the beginning". These uchi deshi became known as Wakajishi, or the "Young Lions" of Mas Oyama and only a few of the hundreds of applicants were chosen each year for the privilege of training full time under the Master. In 1957, Bobby Lowe returned to Hawaii to open the first School of Oyama outside Japan. The beginning of Kyokushin The current World Headquarters were officially opened in June 1964, where the name Kyokushin, meaning "Ultimate truth" was adopted. In the same year the International Karate Organization (IKO) was established. From then, Kyokushin continued to spread to more than 120 countries, and registered members exceed 10 million making it one of the largest martial arts organisations in the world. Among the the better known Kyokushin yudansha (black belts) are Sean Connery (Honorary shodan), Dolph Lundgren (sandan, former Australian heavyweight champion), and President Nelson Mandela of South Africa (Honorary hachidan), and most recently (June 1988), the Australian Prime Minister, John Howard (Honorary godan) who was awarded the grade at the official opening of the Sydney Kyokushin dojo. The End? Sadly, Sosai Mas Oyama died, of Akiyoshi Matsui in charge of the organisation. This has had many political and economic ramifications throughout the Kyokushin world, which are still being resolved. In the end, the result may well be a splintering of Kyokushin, much like Shotokan now appears to have done, with each group claiming to be the one-and-only true heir of Mas Oyama's Kyokushin, either spiritually or even financially. It has even been suggested, not entirely in jest, by one Kyokushin writer in Australia (Harry Rogers) that maybe Oyama created the turmoil on purpose, because he didn't want Kyokushin to survive without him! It is however reasonably certain that all Kyokushin groups, regardless of their ultimate allegiance, will still maintain the standards set by Mas Oyama. Maybe a Kyokushin diaspora will be a good thing, since in all good families, some of the children eventually do leave home and start their own families. Some of the splinter groups may remain faithful to the Kyokushin principles, such as Hanshi Steve Arneil in Great Britain did in 1991. Many others, such as Shigeru Oyama in the U.S., have taken it further by developing their own style based on Kyokushin. Today, the IKO, headed by Kancho Shokei Matsui, is the largest karate organization in the world with over twelve million members in 135 countries Mas Oyama's Brief History July 27th, 1923, born in Southern Korea. Learns Chinese Fist of Chakuriki in the land of Manchuria. He was 9 years old. 1938 - becomes student under Master Gichin Funakoshi of Shotokan Karate. 1946 - enters the mountain for training. 1947 - becomes the champion of All Japan Karate-do Tournament. He studies Goju-ryu Karate extensively under Master Gogen Yamaguchi, and becomes Vice Chairman in the organization, holding 9th Dan degree. 1948 - enters the mountain alone for 18 months of training. 1950 - starts training against the live bulls, living beside the cattle butchery. Out of 47 bulls, 4 killed in instant. 1952 - visits America for Karate instructions and demonstrations in 32 locations. Has 7 times of real matches. 1953 - visits America, he fights against a bull in Chicago, where he breaks its horn by Shuto strike (knife hand). 1955 - goes all around South America and Europe with Bepford Davy, President of Chrysler Corp. He fights numerous mix matches. 1956 - starts small Oyama Dojo at an old ballet studio. 1957 - fights against a bull in Mexico City. 1958 - January, publishes "What is Karate" which becomes a best seller of 500,000 copies. September, invited by FBI in Washington D.C. for Karate instructions and demonstrations. October, invited by West Point Military Academy for Karate instructions and demonstrations. 1964 - Thai Boxing challenges Karate-do, where Oyama Dojo alone accepts. 3 matches 2 wins. 1971 - though a popular comic book series "Karate Baka Ichidai," and the movie "World's Strongest Karate" in 1975, his name and of Kyokushin become known all over Japan. 1975 - holds Kyokushin Kai's First World Karate-do Open Tournament. April 26, 1994. Dies of lung cancer at the age of 70. In addition to described above, he visits elsewhere researching and fighting real matches against other Martial Arts of the world. Kyokushin as the largest Karate organization, he has students numbered 12,000,000 in 140 nations worldwide. He is also noted for starting the Full-Contact, Bare-Knuckle tournament system Class Schedule with Anatoliy ZadorozhnyyAnatoliy Zadorozhnyy is a Black Belt in WUCAA. He is a Black Belt in Shotokan karate, and is specializing also in Kendo and Weapons. 8:00 pm to 9:30 pm

Wednesday

  • Hapkido and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) - Kids (10-14)Everyone wants their kids to have confidence, self-discipline and composure during life's challenging moments. In a world where video games and smartphones have largely replaced outdoor play and sports activities, martial arts not only encourages physical activity but also fine-tunes it to optimize overall health and well-being; optimal fitness can lead to lowered risk of chronic health conditions in childhood and even later in life. Our kid-friendly, experienced instructors approach training with compassion, physical fitness, endurance and strength to encourage a lifetime of balance and well-being. Borrowing its techniques from several disciplines such as karate, jujitsu, judo and aikido, mixed martial arts is a sport with few rules but many elements. Designed to produce warriors who excel in the art of combat as well as self-defense, mixed martial arts is not for the faint of heart; it is a fierce challenge that stretches the limits of mind and body. Our mixed martial arts classes provide a comprehensive and challenging physical workout and a lot of fun for kids. They give your kid the skills to defend effectively in a variety of situations while also building self-discipline and the confidence to face life head-on. We believe martial arts classes should be fun; our professionals provide an encouraging, positive environment for children to learn and grow. Class Schedule with Mikhail KoganMikhail is a Grand Master in Hapkido, State Director in Hapkido-GHA, Grand Master in WUCAA Combat Free Fight, Grand Master & Founder of Spetsnaz USA DART, 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung Fu, and 6th Degree Black Belt in Cruchalo.

    Certifications:

    • Grand Master in Marshal Arts (WUCAA)
    • 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung-Fu
    • Crushalo-Choy 6th Degree Black Belt
    • Turando 5 Degree Back Belt
    • Grand Master Hapkido
    • U.S.S.R. Master of Sport in Combat Sambo
    6:00 pm to 7:30 pm
  • Hapkido and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) - All AgesHapkido (also spelled hap ki do or hapki-do; Hangul: 합기도; Hanja: 合氣道) is a dynamic and highly eclectic Korean martial art. It is a form of self-defense that employs joint locks, grappling and throwing techniques of other martial arts, as well as kicks, punches, and other striking attacks. There is also the use of traditional weapons, including knife, sword, rope, jool bong (nunchaku), cane, short stick (dan bong), and middle-length staff (joong bong, gun, bō (Japanese)) which vary in emphasis depending on the particular tradition examined. Hapkido contains both long- and close-range fighting techniques, utilizing jumping kicks and percussive hand strikes at longer ranges and pressure point strikes, joint locks, or throws at closer fighting distances. Hapkido emphasizes circular motion, redirection of force, and control of the opponent. Practitioners seek to gain advantage through footwork and body positioning to incorporate the use of leverage, avoiding the use of strength against strength. The art adapted from Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu (大東流合気柔術) as it was taught by Choi Yong-Sool (Hangul: 최용술) when he returned to Korea after World War II, having lived in Japan for 30 years. This system was later combined with kicking and striking techniques of indigenous and contemporary arts such as taekkyeon, as well as throwing techniques and ground fighting from Japanese judo. Its history is obscured by the historical animosity between the Korean and Japanese people following the Second World War. Class Schedule with Mikhail KoganMikhail is a Grand Master in Hapkido, State Director in Hapkido-GHA, Grand Master in WUCAA Combat Free Fight, Grand Master & Founder of Spetsnaz USA DART, 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung Fu, and 6th Degree Black Belt in Cruchalo.

    Certifications:

    • Grand Master in Marshal Arts (WUCAA)
    • 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung-Fu
    • Crushalo-Choy 6th Degree Black Belt
    • Turando 5 Degree Back Belt
    • Grand Master Hapkido
    • U.S.S.R. Master of Sport in Combat Sambo
    7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
  • Muay Thai and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) - Adults

    Mixed Martial Arts

    Whether you want to be involved in competitive fighting, or you just want to maximize your physical fitness, endurance and strength, mixed martial arts may be right for you. Borrowing its techniques from several disciplines such as karate, jujitsu, judo and aikido, mixed martial arts is a sport with few rules but many elements. Designed to produce warriors who excel in the art of combat as well as self-defense, mixed martial arts is not for the faint of heart; it is a fierce challenge that stretches the limits of mind and body. Our mixed martial arts classes provide a comprehensive and challenging physical workout. They give you the skills to defend yourself effectively in a variety of situations while also building self-discipline and the confidence to face life head-on. If you live a complicated lifestyle, mixed martial arts can prove to be an indispensable source of stress relief. Our experienced and talented instructors can help you change your life through the ancient principles of physical and mental balance. To improve your self-esteem and attain the strong body of your dreams, sign up for our professional mixed martial arts classes now.

    Muay Thai

    Also known as Thai kickboxing, Muay Thai is a national sport of Thailand and a great passion for many martial arts experts. Muay Thai is considered by many to be the ultimate form of hand-to-hand combat. Using the science of eight limbs, the vigorous combat sport utilizes knees and elbows along with kicks and punches; almost any part of the body is a possible target, and any body part except the head may be used to strike one's opponent. Muay Thai is a professional and an amateur sport, a martial art and a powerful form of self-protection passed down through the centuries. Learning the ancient art of Muay Thai has a variety of benefits in addition to valuable self-defense skills. It builds up core strength and agility and increases overall good shape. Muay Thai also bolsters self-esteem and confidence and teaches discipline, courage and determination. By harnessing the power of the will, it also helps lower stress levels and encourages balanced living. Our Muay Thai classes are taught by highly trained, experienced instructors who support their students every step of the way. Discover your true potential through Muay Thai classes today. Class Schedule
    with Alex LavrentevAlex is USSR Champion in Kickboxing, He also has years of performing, practicing and teaching Muay Thai and Shotokan Karate.   7:30 pm to 9:30 pm

Thursday

  • Self-Defense - All AgesCrime is a potential threat to everyone, and many people, especially women, become victims of violence and rape every day. Sadly, many of the worst outcomes could have been prevented if the victim had been trained in self-defense. Our self-defense classes arm you with priceless skills that prepare you to protect yourself and your family; they can dramatically increase your chances of surviving an attack unharmed. You'll learn strategies to trick your attacker, ways to disable someone larger than you and maneuvers to escape common grabs and holds. With the skills we give you, you'll be able to avoid a confrontation, recognize and take advantage of an attacker's weaknesses, and escape safely when pinned to the ground. Whatever the situation, you'll have the ability to defend yourself effectively. Since staying fit is one of your best weapons against assailants, our self-defense classes start by giving you a great workout to get you on the right track. You can rely on our experienced instructors to give you every tool you need to remain safe and confident. Empower yourself by joining our self-defense classes today, and worry less about what could happen tomorrow. Class Schedule with Mikhail KoganMikhail is a Grand Master in Hapkido, State Director in Hapkido-GHA, Grand Master in WUCAA Combat Free Fight, Grand Master & Founder of Spetsnaz USA DART, 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung Fu, and 6th Degree Black Belt in Cruchalo.

    Certifications:

    • Grand Master in Marshal Arts (WUCAA)
    • 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung-Fu
    • Crushalo-Choy 6th Degree Black Belt
    • Turando 5 Degree Back Belt
    • Grand Master Hapkido
    • U.S.S.R. Master of Sport in Combat Sambo
    6:00 pm to 7:00 pm
  • Kyokushin and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) – All Ages Masutatsu (Mas) Oyama was born Yong I-Choi on the 27th of July, 1923, in a village not far from Gunsan in Southern Korea. At a relatively young age he was sent to Manchuria, in Southern China, to live on his sister's farm. At the age of nine, he started studying the Southern Chinese form of Kempo called Eighteen hands from a Mr. Yi who was at the time working on the farm. When Oyama returned to Korea at the age of 12, he continued his training in Korean Kempo. In 1938, at the age of 15, he travelled to Japan to train as an aviator, to be like his hero of the time, Korea's first fighter pilot. Survival on his own at that age proved to be more difficult than he thought, especially as a Korean in Japan, and the aviator training fell by the wayside. Gichin Funakoshi He did however continue martial arts training, by participating in judo and boxing, and one day he noticed some students training in Okinawan Karate. This interested him very much and he went to train at the dojo of Gichin Funakoshi at Takushoku University, where he learned what is today known as CyberDojo home pages. His training progress was such that by the age of seventeen he was already a 2nd dan, and by the time he entered the Japanese Imperial Army at 20, he was a fourth dan. At this point he also took a serious interest in judo, and his progress there was no less amazing. By the time he had quit training in Judo. So Nei Chu The defeat of Japan and the subsequent indignity of Occupation almost proved to be too much for Mas Oyama, who nearly despaired. Fortunately for all of us, So Nei Chu came into his life at that time. Master So, another Korean (from Oyama's own province) living in Japan, was one of the highest authorities on Goju Ryu in Japan at the time. He was renowned for both his physical and spiritual strength. It was he who encouraged Mas Oyama to dedicate his life to the Martial Way. It was he too who suggested that Oyama should retreat away from the rest of the world for 3 years while training his mind and body. Mountain Training When he was 23 years old, Mas Oyama met Eiji Yoshikawa, the author of the novel Musashi, which was based on the life and exploits of Japan's most famous Samurai. Both the novel and the author helped to teach Mas Oyama about the Samurai Bushido code and what it meant. That same year, Oyama went to Mt. Minobu in the Chiba Prefecture, where Musashi had developed his Nito-Ryu style of sword fighting. Oyama thought that this would be an appropriate place to commence the rigorous of training he had planned for himself. Among the things he took with him was a copy of Yoshikawa's book. A student named Yashiro also came with him. The relative solitude was strongly felt, and after 6 months, Yashiro secretly fled during the night. It became even harder for Oyama, who wanted more than ever to return to civilization. So Nei Chu wrote to him that he should shave off an eyebrow in order to get rid of the urge. Surely he wouldn't want anyone to see him that way! This and other more moving words convinced Oyama to continue, and he resolved to become the most powerful karate-ka in Japan. Soon however, his sponsor informed him that he was no longer able to support him and so, after fourteen months, he had to end his solitude. Mas Oyama Makiwara A few months later, in 1947, Mas Oyama won the karate section of the first Japanese National Martial Arts Championships after WWII. However, he still felt empty for not having completed the three years of solitude. He then decided to dedicate his life completely to karate-do. So he started again, this time on Mt. Kiyozumi, also in Chiba Prefecture. This site he chose for its spiritually uplifting environment. This time his training was fanatical — 12 hours a day every day with no rest days, standing under (cold) buffeting waterfalls, breaking river stones with his hands, using trees as makiwara, jumping over rapidly growing flax plants hundreds of times each day. Each day also included a period of study of the ancients classics on the Martial arts, Zen, and philosophy. After eighteen months he came down fully confident of himself, and able to take control of his life. Never again would he be so heavily influenced by his society around him. (Though it is probably safe to say that his circumstances were also probably never again as traumatic!) Bulls, Challengers, and the Godhand In 1950, Sosai (the founder) Mas Oyama started testing (and demonstrating) his power by fighting bulls. In all, he fought 52 bulls, three of which were killed instantly, and 49 had their horns taken off with knife hand blows. That it is not to say that it was all that easy for him. Oyama was fond of remembering that his first attempt just resulted in an angry bull. In 1957, at the age of 34, he was nearly killed in Mexico when a bull got some of his own back and gored him. Oyama somehow managed to pull the bull off and break off his horn. He was bedridden for 6 months while he recovered from the usually fatal wound. Today of course, the animal rights groups would have something to say about these demonstrations, despite the fact that the animals were already all destined for slaughter. In 1952, he travelled the United States for a year, demonstrating his karate live and on national television. During subsequent years, he took on all challengers, resulting in fights with 270 different people. The vast majority of these were defeated with one punch! A fight never lasted more than three minutes, and most rarely lasted more than a few seconds. His fighting principle was simple — if he got through to you, that was it. If he hit you, you broke. If you blocked a rib punch, you arm was broken or dislocated. If you didn't block, your rib was broken. He became known as the Godhand, a living manifestation of the Japanese warriors' maxim Ichi geki, Hissatsu or "One strike, certain death". To him, this was the true aim of technique in karate. The fancy footwork and intricate techniques were secondary (though he was also known for the power of his head kicks). It was during one of his visits to the United States that Mas Oyama met Jacques Sandulescu, a big (190 cm and 190 kg of muscle) Romanian who had been taken prisoner by the Red Army at the age of 16, and sent to the coal mines as a slave laborer for two years. They quickly became friends and remained so for the rest of Oyama's life, and Jacques still trains and acts as advisor to the IKO(1) to this day. Oyama Dojo In 1953, Mas Oyama opened his first "Dojo", a grass lot in Mejiro in Tokyo. In 1956, the first real Dojo was opened in a former ballet studio behind Rikkyo University, 500 meters from the location of the current Japanese honbu dojo (headquarters). By 1957 there were 700 members, despite the high drop-out rate due to the harshness of training. Practitioners of other styles came to train here too, for the jis-sen kumite (full contact fighting). One of the original instructors, Kenji Kato, has said that they would observe those from other styles, and adopt any techniques that "would be good in a real fight". This was how Mas Oyama's karate evolved. He took techniques from all martial arts, and did not restrict himself to karate alone. The Oyama Dojo members took their kumite seriously, seeing it primarily as a fighting art, so they expected to hit and to be hit. With few restrictions, attacking the head was common, usually with the palm heel or towel-wrapped knuckles. Grabs, throws, and groin attacks were also common. Kumite rounds would continue till one person loudly conceded defeat. Injuries occurred on a daily basis and the drop out rate was high (over 90%). They had no official do-gi and wore whatever they had. Bobby Lowe In 1952, Mas Oyama gave a demonstration in Hawaii. A young Bobby Lowe saw him and was stunned by the power Oyama demonstrated. It was not as though Bobby Lowe was inexperienced in martial arts. Though still quite young, his achievements to date were not much less than those of Mas Oyama himself. His father had been a Kung Fu instructor, and he had participated in any fighting art he could find. By the age of 23, he was yondan in judo, nidan in kempo, shodan in aikido, and a highly regarded welterweight boxer. It was not long before Bobby Lowe became the first Kyokushin uchi deshi or "live-in student" of Mas Oyama's. He trained daily with Mas Oyama for one and a half years. Eventually, an uchi deshi's time became "1000 days for the beginning". These uchi deshi became known as Wakajishi, or the "Young Lions" of Mas Oyama and only a few of the hundreds of applicants were chosen each year for the privilege of training full time under the Master. In 1957, Bobby Lowe returned to Hawaii to open the first School of Oyama outside Japan. The beginning of Kyokushin The current World Headquarters were officially opened in June 1964, where the name Kyokushin, meaning "Ultimate truth" was adopted. In the same year the International Karate Organization (IKO) was established. From then, Kyokushin continued to spread to more than 120 countries, and registered members exceed 10 million making it one of the largest martial arts organisations in the world. Among the the better known Kyokushin yudansha (black belts) are Sean Connery (Honorary shodan), Dolph Lundgren (sandan, former Australian heavyweight champion), and President Nelson Mandela of South Africa (Honorary hachidan), and most recently (June 1988), the Australian Prime Minister, John Howard (Honorary godan) who was awarded the grade at the official opening of the Sydney Kyokushin dojo. The End? Sadly, Sosai Mas Oyama died, of Akiyoshi Matsui in charge of the organisation. This has had many political and economic ramifications throughout the Kyokushin world, which are still being resolved. In the end, the result may well be a splintering of Kyokushin, much like Shotokan now appears to have done, with each group claiming to be the one-and-only true heir of Mas Oyama's Kyokushin, either spiritually or even financially. It has even been suggested, not entirely in jest, by one Kyokushin writer in Australia (Harry Rogers) that maybe Oyama created the turmoil on purpose, because he didn't want Kyokushin to survive without him! It is however reasonably certain that all Kyokushin groups, regardless of their ultimate allegiance, will still maintain the standards set by Mas Oyama. Maybe a Kyokushin diaspora will be a good thing, since in all good families, some of the children eventually do leave home and start their own families. Some of the splinter groups may remain faithful to the Kyokushin principles, such as Hanshi Steve Arneil in Great Britain did in 1991. Many others, such as Shigeru Oyama in the U.S., have taken it further by developing their own style based on Kyokushin. Today, the IKO, headed by Kancho Shokei Matsui, is the largest karate organization in the world with over twelve million members in 135 countries Mas Oyama's Brief History July 27th, 1923, born in Southern Korea. Learns Chinese Fist of Chakuriki in the land of Manchuria. He was 9 years old. 1938 - becomes student under Master Gichin Funakoshi of Shotokan Karate. 1946 - enters the mountain for training. 1947 - becomes the champion of All Japan Karate-do Tournament. He studies Goju-ryu Karate extensively under Master Gogen Yamaguchi, and becomes Vice Chairman in the organization, holding 9th Dan degree. 1948 - enters the mountain alone for 18 months of training. 1950 - starts training against the live bulls, living beside the cattle butchery. Out of 47 bulls, 4 killed in instant. 1952 - visits America for Karate instructions and demonstrations in 32 locations. Has 7 times of real matches. 1953 - visits America, he fights against a bull in Chicago, where he breaks its horn by Shuto strike (knife hand). 1955 - goes all around South America and Europe with Bepford Davy, President of Chrysler Corp. He fights numerous mix matches. 1956 - starts small Oyama Dojo at an old ballet studio. 1957 - fights against a bull in Mexico City. 1958 - January, publishes "What is Karate" which becomes a best seller of 500,000 copies. September, invited by FBI in Washington D.C. for Karate instructions and demonstrations. October, invited by West Point Military Academy for Karate instructions and demonstrations. 1964 - Thai Boxing challenges Karate-do, where Oyama Dojo alone accepts. 3 matches 2 wins. 1971 - though a popular comic book series "Karate Baka Ichidai," and the movie "World's Strongest Karate" in 1975, his name and of Kyokushin become known all over Japan. 1975 - holds Kyokushin Kai's First World Karate-do Open Tournament. April 26, 1994. Dies of lung cancer at the age of 70. In addition to described above, he visits elsewhere researching and fighting real matches against other Martial Arts of the world. Kyokushin as the largest Karate organization, he has students numbered 12,000,000 in 140 nations worldwide. He is also noted for starting the Full-Contact, Bare-Knuckle tournament system Class Schedule with Anatoliy ZadorozhnyyAnatoliy Zadorozhnyy is a Black Belt in WUCAA. He is a Black Belt in Shotokan karate, and is specializing also in Kendo and Weapons. 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Friday

  • Hapkido and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) - Kids (10-14)Everyone wants their kids to have confidence, self-discipline and composure during life's challenging moments. In a world where video games and smartphones have largely replaced outdoor play and sports activities, martial arts not only encourages physical activity but also fine-tunes it to optimize overall health and well-being; optimal fitness can lead to lowered risk of chronic health conditions in childhood and even later in life. Our kid-friendly, experienced instructors approach training with compassion, physical fitness, endurance and strength to encourage a lifetime of balance and well-being. Borrowing its techniques from several disciplines such as karate, jujitsu, judo and aikido, mixed martial arts is a sport with few rules but many elements. Designed to produce warriors who excel in the art of combat as well as self-defense, mixed martial arts is not for the faint of heart; it is a fierce challenge that stretches the limits of mind and body. Our mixed martial arts classes provide a comprehensive and challenging physical workout and a lot of fun for kids. They give your kid the skills to defend effectively in a variety of situations while also building self-discipline and the confidence to face life head-on. We believe martial arts classes should be fun; our professionals provide an encouraging, positive environment for children to learn and grow. Class Schedule with Mikhail KoganMikhail is a Grand Master in Hapkido, State Director in Hapkido-GHA, Grand Master in WUCAA Combat Free Fight, Grand Master & Founder of Spetsnaz USA DART, 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung Fu, and 6th Degree Black Belt in Cruchalo.

    Certifications:

    • Grand Master in Marshal Arts (WUCAA)
    • 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung-Fu
    • Crushalo-Choy 6th Degree Black Belt
    • Turando 5 Degree Back Belt
    • Grand Master Hapkido
    • U.S.S.R. Master of Sport in Combat Sambo
    6:00 pm to 7:30 pm
  • Hapkido and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) - All AgesHapkido (also spelled hap ki do or hapki-do; Hangul: 합기도; Hanja: 合氣道) is a dynamic and highly eclectic Korean martial art. It is a form of self-defense that employs joint locks, grappling and throwing techniques of other martial arts, as well as kicks, punches, and other striking attacks. There is also the use of traditional weapons, including knife, sword, rope, jool bong (nunchaku), cane, short stick (dan bong), and middle-length staff (joong bong, gun, bō (Japanese)) which vary in emphasis depending on the particular tradition examined. Hapkido contains both long- and close-range fighting techniques, utilizing jumping kicks and percussive hand strikes at longer ranges and pressure point strikes, joint locks, or throws at closer fighting distances. Hapkido emphasizes circular motion, redirection of force, and control of the opponent. Practitioners seek to gain advantage through footwork and body positioning to incorporate the use of leverage, avoiding the use of strength against strength. The art adapted from Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu (大東流合気柔術) as it was taught by Choi Yong-Sool (Hangul: 최용술) when he returned to Korea after World War II, having lived in Japan for 30 years. This system was later combined with kicking and striking techniques of indigenous and contemporary arts such as taekkyeon, as well as throwing techniques and ground fighting from Japanese judo. Its history is obscured by the historical animosity between the Korean and Japanese people following the Second World War. Class Schedule with Mikhail KoganMikhail is a Grand Master in Hapkido, State Director in Hapkido-GHA, Grand Master in WUCAA Combat Free Fight, Grand Master & Founder of Spetsnaz USA DART, 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung Fu, and 6th Degree Black Belt in Cruchalo.

    Certifications:

    • Grand Master in Marshal Arts (WUCAA)
    • 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung-Fu
    • Crushalo-Choy 6th Degree Black Belt
    • Turando 5 Degree Back Belt
    • Grand Master Hapkido
    • U.S.S.R. Master of Sport in Combat Sambo
    7:30 pm to 9:30 pm

Saturday

  • Kung Fu – Kids (3.5-5)Kung fu/Kungfu or Gung fu/Gongfu (/ˌkʌŋˈfuː/ or /ˌkʊŋˈfuː/; 功夫, Pinyin: gōngfu) is a Chinese term referring to any study, learning, or practice that requires patience, energy, and time to complete , often used in the West to refer to Chinese martial arts. It is only in the late twentieth century, that this term was used in relation to Chinese Martial Arts by the Chinese community. The Oxford English Dictionary defines the term "Kung-fu" as "a primarily unarmed Chinese martial art resembling karate." This illustrates how the meaning of this term has been changed in English. The origin of this change can be attributed to the misunderstanding or mistranslation of the term through movie subtitles or dubbing. In its original meaning, kung fu can refer to any skill achieved through hard work and practice, not necessarily martial arts. The Chinese literal equivalent of "Chinese martial art" would be 中國武術 zhōngguó wǔshù. In Chinese, Gōngfu (功夫) is a compound of two words, combining 功 (gōng) meaning "work", "achievement", or "merit", and 夫 (fū) which is alternately treated as being a word for "man" or as a particle or nominal suffix with diverse meanings (the same character is used to write both). A literal rendering of the first interpretation would be "achievement of man", while the second is often described as "work and time/effort". Its connotation is that of an accomplishment arrived at by great effort of time and energy. In Mandarin, when two "first tone" words such as gōng and fū are combined, the second word often takes a neutral tone, in this case forming gōngfu. The word is also sometimes written as 工夫, this version often being used for more general , non-martial arts usages of the term. Originally, to practice Kung Fu did not just mean to practice Chinese martial arts. Instead, it referred to the process of one's training - the strengthening of the body and the mind, the learning and the perfection of one's skills - rather than to what was being trained. It refers to excellence achieved through long practice in any endeavor. This meaning can be traced to classical writings, especially those of Neo-Confucianism, which emphasize the importance of effort in education. In the colloquial, one can say that a person's Kung Fu is good in cooking, or that someone has Kung Fu in calligraphy; saying that a person possesses Kung Fu in an area implies skill in that area, which they have worked hard to develop. Someone with "bad kung Fu" simply has not put enough time and effort into training, or seems to lack the motivation to do so. Kung Fu is also a name used for the elaborate Fujian tea ceremony (kung Fu Cha). However, the phrase 功夫武術 (Kung Fu Wu Shu) does exist in Chinese and could be (loosely) translated as 'the skills of the martial arts'. Class Schedule with Elena KadigrovaElena Kadigrova is 5 times European Champion. She is a World Medalist in Kung Fu, in Forms, Weapons and Sparring. Elena is a Black belt in a Combat Kung Fu. She also has more than 10 years of teaching and training Kung Fu, Forms with Weapons and Sparring for all ages in the United States. Prior to coming to US Elena was for 4 years a Wushu Teacher at the Children’s Sport School (Berdyansk, Ukraine). She was Awarded a rank of the “International Degree Athlete in Wushu” by Ministry of Culture and Sport of the Ukraine.

    Ranking:

    • Member of National Ukrainian Wushu Taolu Team from 1991 to 2000.
    • Bronze medalist at World Wushu Championship in Women’s Gunshu (Cudgel) Baltimore (USA-1995).
    • 1st place in Women’s Duilian (Set Sparing) at European Wushu Cup Moscow (Russia-1993).
    • 1st place in Women’s Chanquan (Long fist), Jianshu (Straight sword), Duilian (Set Sparing) and Traditional Fist at European Wushu Cup Istanbul (Turkey-1995).
    • 1st place in a Women’s Taolu Program at International Wushu Championship Cairo (Egypt-1995).
    • 1st place in a Women’s Traditional Weapon at European Wushu Championship Rome (Italy-1996).
    • 1st place in Women’s Chanquan (Long fist), Jianshu (Straight sword) in European Wushu Championship (Greece-1998).
    • 1st place in Women’s Taolu Program at International Wushu Cup Bergamo (Italy-1998).
    • 1st places in Women’s Individual Taolu Program at National Ukrainian Wushu Competitions 1991-2000
    10:00 am to 11:00 am
  • Kung Fu - Kids (5-10)Everyone wants their kids to have confidence, self-discipline and composure during life's challenging moments. The ancient martial arts can deliver the tools your children need to develop these traits. Kung Fu builds character by teaching the value of respect, effort and focus. It emphasizes goal-setting, rank, achievement and self-improvement. Children who are well-trained in martial arts can defend themselves against predators like bullies, and they feel more comfortable in social situations. In a world where video games and smartphones have largely replaced outdoor play and sports activities, Kung Fu not only encourages physical activity but also fine-tunes it to optimize overall health and well-being; optimal fitness can lead to lowered risk of chronic health conditions in childhood and even later in life. Our kid-friendly, experienced instructors approach training with compassion, strength and wisdom to encourage a lifetime of balance and well-being. We believe Kung Fu classes should be fun; our professionals provide an encouraging, positive environment for children to learn and grow. Give your children the lifelong benefits of Kung Fu training by signing up for our professional classes today. Class Schedule with Elena KadigrovaElena Kadigrova is 5 times European Champion. She is a World Medalist in Kung Fu, in Forms, Weapons and Sparring. Elena is a Black belt in a Combat Kung Fu. She also has more than 10 years of teaching and training Kung Fu, Forms with Weapons and Sparring for all ages in the United States. Prior to coming to US Elena was for 4 years a Wushu Teacher at the Children’s Sport School (Berdyansk, Ukraine). She was Awarded a rank of the “International Degree Athlete in Wushu” by Ministry of Culture and Sport of the Ukraine.

    Ranking:

    • Member of National Ukrainian Wushu Taolu Team from 1991 to 2000.
    • Bronze medalist at World Wushu Championship in Women’s Gunshu (Cudgel) Baltimore (USA-1995).
    • 1st place in Women’s Duilian (Set Sparing) at European Wushu Cup Moscow (Russia-1993).
    • 1st place in Women’s Chanquan (Long fist), Jianshu (Straight sword), Duilian (Set Sparing) and Traditional Fist at European Wushu Cup Istanbul (Turkey-1995).
    • 1st place in a Women’s Taolu Program at International Wushu Championship Cairo (Egypt-1995).
    • 1st place in a Women’s Traditional Weapon at European Wushu Championship Rome (Italy-1996).
    • 1st place in Women’s Chanquan (Long fist), Jianshu (Straight sword) in European Wushu Championship (Greece-1998).
    • 1st place in Women’s Taolu Program at International Wushu Cup Bergamo (Italy-1998).
    • 1st places in Women’s Individual Taolu Program at National Ukrainian Wushu Competitions 1991-2000
    11:00 am to 12:30 pm
  • Kyokushin and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) – All Ages Masutatsu (Mas) Oyama was born Yong I-Choi on the 27th of July, 1923, in a village not far from Gunsan in Southern Korea. At a relatively young age he was sent to Manchuria, in Southern China, to live on his sister's farm. At the age of nine, he started studying the Southern Chinese form of Kempo called Eighteen hands from a Mr. Yi who was at the time working on the farm. When Oyama returned to Korea at the age of 12, he continued his training in Korean Kempo. In 1938, at the age of 15, he travelled to Japan to train as an aviator, to be like his hero of the time, Korea's first fighter pilot. Survival on his own at that age proved to be more difficult than he thought, especially as a Korean in Japan, and the aviator training fell by the wayside. Gichin Funakoshi He did however continue martial arts training, by participating in judo and boxing, and one day he noticed some students training in Okinawan Karate. This interested him very much and he went to train at the dojo of Gichin Funakoshi at Takushoku University, where he learned what is today known as CyberDojo home pages. His training progress was such that by the age of seventeen he was already a 2nd dan, and by the time he entered the Japanese Imperial Army at 20, he was a fourth dan. At this point he also took a serious interest in judo, and his progress there was no less amazing. By the time he had quit training in Judo. So Nei Chu The defeat of Japan and the subsequent indignity of Occupation almost proved to be too much for Mas Oyama, who nearly despaired. Fortunately for all of us, So Nei Chu came into his life at that time. Master So, another Korean (from Oyama's own province) living in Japan, was one of the highest authorities on Goju Ryu in Japan at the time. He was renowned for both his physical and spiritual strength. It was he who encouraged Mas Oyama to dedicate his life to the Martial Way. It was he too who suggested that Oyama should retreat away from the rest of the world for 3 years while training his mind and body. Mountain Training When he was 23 years old, Mas Oyama met Eiji Yoshikawa, the author of the novel Musashi, which was based on the life and exploits of Japan's most famous Samurai. Both the novel and the author helped to teach Mas Oyama about the Samurai Bushido code and what it meant. That same year, Oyama went to Mt. Minobu in the Chiba Prefecture, where Musashi had developed his Nito-Ryu style of sword fighting. Oyama thought that this would be an appropriate place to commence the rigorous of training he had planned for himself. Among the things he took with him was a copy of Yoshikawa's book. A student named Yashiro also came with him. The relative solitude was strongly felt, and after 6 months, Yashiro secretly fled during the night. It became even harder for Oyama, who wanted more than ever to return to civilization. So Nei Chu wrote to him that he should shave off an eyebrow in order to get rid of the urge. Surely he wouldn't want anyone to see him that way! This and other more moving words convinced Oyama to continue, and he resolved to become the most powerful karate-ka in Japan. Soon however, his sponsor informed him that he was no longer able to support him and so, after fourteen months, he had to end his solitude. Mas Oyama Makiwara A few months later, in 1947, Mas Oyama won the karate section of the first Japanese National Martial Arts Championships after WWII. However, he still felt empty for not having completed the three years of solitude. He then decided to dedicate his life completely to karate-do. So he started again, this time on Mt. Kiyozumi, also in Chiba Prefecture. This site he chose for its spiritually uplifting environment. This time his training was fanatical — 12 hours a day every day with no rest days, standing under (cold) buffeting waterfalls, breaking river stones with his hands, using trees as makiwara, jumping over rapidly growing flax plants hundreds of times each day. Each day also included a period of study of the ancients classics on the Martial arts, Zen, and philosophy. After eighteen months he came down fully confident of himself, and able to take control of his life. Never again would he be so heavily influenced by his society around him. (Though it is probably safe to say that his circumstances were also probably never again as traumatic!) Bulls, Challengers, and the Godhand In 1950, Sosai (the founder) Mas Oyama started testing (and demonstrating) his power by fighting bulls. In all, he fought 52 bulls, three of which were killed instantly, and 49 had their horns taken off with knife hand blows. That it is not to say that it was all that easy for him. Oyama was fond of remembering that his first attempt just resulted in an angry bull. In 1957, at the age of 34, he was nearly killed in Mexico when a bull got some of his own back and gored him. Oyama somehow managed to pull the bull off and break off his horn. He was bedridden for 6 months while he recovered from the usually fatal wound. Today of course, the animal rights groups would have something to say about these demonstrations, despite the fact that the animals were already all destined for slaughter. In 1952, he travelled the United States for a year, demonstrating his karate live and on national television. During subsequent years, he took on all challengers, resulting in fights with 270 different people. The vast majority of these were defeated with one punch! A fight never lasted more than three minutes, and most rarely lasted more than a few seconds. His fighting principle was simple — if he got through to you, that was it. If he hit you, you broke. If you blocked a rib punch, you arm was broken or dislocated. If you didn't block, your rib was broken. He became known as the Godhand, a living manifestation of the Japanese warriors' maxim Ichi geki, Hissatsu or "One strike, certain death". To him, this was the true aim of technique in karate. The fancy footwork and intricate techniques were secondary (though he was also known for the power of his head kicks). It was during one of his visits to the United States that Mas Oyama met Jacques Sandulescu, a big (190 cm and 190 kg of muscle) Romanian who had been taken prisoner by the Red Army at the age of 16, and sent to the coal mines as a slave laborer for two years. They quickly became friends and remained so for the rest of Oyama's life, and Jacques still trains and acts as advisor to the IKO(1) to this day. Oyama Dojo In 1953, Mas Oyama opened his first "Dojo", a grass lot in Mejiro in Tokyo. In 1956, the first real Dojo was opened in a former ballet studio behind Rikkyo University, 500 meters from the location of the current Japanese honbu dojo (headquarters). By 1957 there were 700 members, despite the high drop-out rate due to the harshness of training. Practitioners of other styles came to train here too, for the jis-sen kumite (full contact fighting). One of the original instructors, Kenji Kato, has said that they would observe those from other styles, and adopt any techniques that "would be good in a real fight". This was how Mas Oyama's karate evolved. He took techniques from all martial arts, and did not restrict himself to karate alone. The Oyama Dojo members took their kumite seriously, seeing it primarily as a fighting art, so they expected to hit and to be hit. With few restrictions, attacking the head was common, usually with the palm heel or towel-wrapped knuckles. Grabs, throws, and groin attacks were also common. Kumite rounds would continue till one person loudly conceded defeat. Injuries occurred on a daily basis and the drop out rate was high (over 90%). They had no official do-gi and wore whatever they had. Bobby Lowe In 1952, Mas Oyama gave a demonstration in Hawaii. A young Bobby Lowe saw him and was stunned by the power Oyama demonstrated. It was not as though Bobby Lowe was inexperienced in martial arts. Though still quite young, his achievements to date were not much less than those of Mas Oyama himself. His father had been a Kung Fu instructor, and he had participated in any fighting art he could find. By the age of 23, he was yondan in judo, nidan in kempo, shodan in aikido, and a highly regarded welterweight boxer. It was not long before Bobby Lowe became the first Kyokushin uchi deshi or "live-in student" of Mas Oyama's. He trained daily with Mas Oyama for one and a half years. Eventually, an uchi deshi's time became "1000 days for the beginning". These uchi deshi became known as Wakajishi, or the "Young Lions" of Mas Oyama and only a few of the hundreds of applicants were chosen each year for the privilege of training full time under the Master. In 1957, Bobby Lowe returned to Hawaii to open the first School of Oyama outside Japan. The beginning of Kyokushin The current World Headquarters were officially opened in June 1964, where the name Kyokushin, meaning "Ultimate truth" was adopted. In the same year the International Karate Organization (IKO) was established. From then, Kyokushin continued to spread to more than 120 countries, and registered members exceed 10 million making it one of the largest martial arts organisations in the world. Among the the better known Kyokushin yudansha (black belts) are Sean Connery (Honorary shodan), Dolph Lundgren (sandan, former Australian heavyweight champion), and President Nelson Mandela of South Africa (Honorary hachidan), and most recently (June 1988), the Australian Prime Minister, John Howard (Honorary godan) who was awarded the grade at the official opening of the Sydney Kyokushin dojo. The End? Sadly, Sosai Mas Oyama died, of Akiyoshi Matsui in charge of the organisation. This has had many political and economic ramifications throughout the Kyokushin world, which are still being resolved. In the end, the result may well be a splintering of Kyokushin, much like Shotokan now appears to have done, with each group claiming to be the one-and-only true heir of Mas Oyama's Kyokushin, either spiritually or even financially. It has even been suggested, not entirely in jest, by one Kyokushin writer in Australia (Harry Rogers) that maybe Oyama created the turmoil on purpose, because he didn't want Kyokushin to survive without him! It is however reasonably certain that all Kyokushin groups, regardless of their ultimate allegiance, will still maintain the standards set by Mas Oyama. Maybe a Kyokushin diaspora will be a good thing, since in all good families, some of the children eventually do leave home and start their own families. Some of the splinter groups may remain faithful to the Kyokushin principles, such as Hanshi Steve Arneil in Great Britain did in 1991. Many others, such as Shigeru Oyama in the U.S., have taken it further by developing their own style based on Kyokushin. Today, the IKO, headed by Kancho Shokei Matsui, is the largest karate organization in the world with over twelve million members in 135 countries Mas Oyama's Brief History July 27th, 1923, born in Southern Korea. Learns Chinese Fist of Chakuriki in the land of Manchuria. He was 9 years old. 1938 - becomes student under Master Gichin Funakoshi of Shotokan Karate. 1946 - enters the mountain for training. 1947 - becomes the champion of All Japan Karate-do Tournament. He studies Goju-ryu Karate extensively under Master Gogen Yamaguchi, and becomes Vice Chairman in the organization, holding 9th Dan degree. 1948 - enters the mountain alone for 18 months of training. 1950 - starts training against the live bulls, living beside the cattle butchery. Out of 47 bulls, 4 killed in instant. 1952 - visits America for Karate instructions and demonstrations in 32 locations. Has 7 times of real matches. 1953 - visits America, he fights against a bull in Chicago, where he breaks its horn by Shuto strike (knife hand). 1955 - goes all around South America and Europe with Bepford Davy, President of Chrysler Corp. He fights numerous mix matches. 1956 - starts small Oyama Dojo at an old ballet studio. 1957 - fights against a bull in Mexico City. 1958 - January, publishes "What is Karate" which becomes a best seller of 500,000 copies. September, invited by FBI in Washington D.C. for Karate instructions and demonstrations. October, invited by West Point Military Academy for Karate instructions and demonstrations. 1964 - Thai Boxing challenges Karate-do, where Oyama Dojo alone accepts. 3 matches 2 wins. 1971 - though a popular comic book series "Karate Baka Ichidai," and the movie "World's Strongest Karate" in 1975, his name and of Kyokushin become known all over Japan. 1975 - holds Kyokushin Kai's First World Karate-do Open Tournament. April 26, 1994. Dies of lung cancer at the age of 70. In addition to described above, he visits elsewhere researching and fighting real matches against other Martial Arts of the world. Kyokushin as the largest Karate organization, he has students numbered 12,000,000 in 140 nations worldwide. He is also noted for starting the Full-Contact, Bare-Knuckle tournament system Class Schedule with Anatoliy ZadorozhnyyAnatoliy Zadorozhnyy is a Black Belt in WUCAA. He is a Black Belt in Shotokan karate, and is specializing also in Kendo and Weapons. 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm

Sunday

  • Kung Fu - Kids (5-10)Everyone wants their kids to have confidence, self-discipline and composure during life's challenging moments. The ancient martial arts can deliver the tools your children need to develop these traits. Kung Fu builds character by teaching the value of respect, effort and focus. It emphasizes goal-setting, rank, achievement and self-improvement. Children who are well-trained in martial arts can defend themselves against predators like bullies, and they feel more comfortable in social situations. In a world where video games and smartphones have largely replaced outdoor play and sports activities, Kung Fu not only encourages physical activity but also fine-tunes it to optimize overall health and well-being; optimal fitness can lead to lowered risk of chronic health conditions in childhood and even later in life. Our kid-friendly, experienced instructors approach training with compassion, strength and wisdom to encourage a lifetime of balance and well-being. We believe Kung Fu classes should be fun; our professionals provide an encouraging, positive environment for children to learn and grow. Give your children the lifelong benefits of Kung Fu training by signing up for our professional classes today. Class Schedule with Elena KadigrovaElena Kadigrova is 5 times European Champion. She is a World Medalist in Kung Fu, in Forms, Weapons and Sparring. Elena is a Black belt in a Combat Kung Fu. She also has more than 10 years of teaching and training Kung Fu, Forms with Weapons and Sparring for all ages in the United States. Prior to coming to US Elena was for 4 years a Wushu Teacher at the Children’s Sport School (Berdyansk, Ukraine). She was Awarded a rank of the “International Degree Athlete in Wushu” by Ministry of Culture and Sport of the Ukraine.

    Ranking:

    • Member of National Ukrainian Wushu Taolu Team from 1991 to 2000.
    • Bronze medalist at World Wushu Championship in Women’s Gunshu (Cudgel) Baltimore (USA-1995).
    • 1st place in Women’s Duilian (Set Sparing) at European Wushu Cup Moscow (Russia-1993).
    • 1st place in Women’s Chanquan (Long fist), Jianshu (Straight sword), Duilian (Set Sparing) and Traditional Fist at European Wushu Cup Istanbul (Turkey-1995).
    • 1st place in a Women’s Taolu Program at International Wushu Championship Cairo (Egypt-1995).
    • 1st place in a Women’s Traditional Weapon at European Wushu Championship Rome (Italy-1996).
    • 1st place in Women’s Chanquan (Long fist), Jianshu (Straight sword) in European Wushu Championship (Greece-1998).
    • 1st place in Women’s Taolu Program at International Wushu Cup Bergamo (Italy-1998).
    • 1st places in Women’s Individual Taolu Program at National Ukrainian Wushu Competitions 1991-2000
    9:30 am to 11:00 am
  • Hapkido and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) - All AgesHapkido (also spelled hap ki do or hapki-do; Hangul: 합기도; Hanja: 合氣道) is a dynamic and highly eclectic Korean martial art. It is a form of self-defense that employs joint locks, grappling and throwing techniques of other martial arts, as well as kicks, punches, and other striking attacks. There is also the use of traditional weapons, including knife, sword, rope, jool bong (nunchaku), cane, short stick (dan bong), and middle-length staff (joong bong, gun, bō (Japanese)) which vary in emphasis depending on the particular tradition examined. Hapkido contains both long- and close-range fighting techniques, utilizing jumping kicks and percussive hand strikes at longer ranges and pressure point strikes, joint locks, or throws at closer fighting distances. Hapkido emphasizes circular motion, redirection of force, and control of the opponent. Practitioners seek to gain advantage through footwork and body positioning to incorporate the use of leverage, avoiding the use of strength against strength. The art adapted from Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu (大東流合気柔術) as it was taught by Choi Yong-Sool (Hangul: 최용술) when he returned to Korea after World War II, having lived in Japan for 30 years. This system was later combined with kicking and striking techniques of indigenous and contemporary arts such as taekkyeon, as well as throwing techniques and ground fighting from Japanese judo. Its history is obscured by the historical animosity between the Korean and Japanese people following the Second World War. Class Schedule with Mikhail KoganMikhail is a Grand Master in Hapkido, State Director in Hapkido-GHA, Grand Master in WUCAA Combat Free Fight, Grand Master & Founder of Spetsnaz USA DART, 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung Fu, and 6th Degree Black Belt in Cruchalo.

    Certifications:

    • Grand Master in Marshal Arts (WUCAA)
    • 6th Degree Black Belt in Combat Kung-Fu
    • Crushalo-Choy 6th Degree Black Belt
    • Turando 5 Degree Back Belt
    • Grand Master Hapkido
    • U.S.S.R. Master of Sport in Combat Sambo
    11:00 am to 1:00 pm
  • Kung Fu - All AgesBased on the principles of Qigong and Taoism, Tai Chi is a system of meditative exercises that promote physical and emotional healing and disease prevention safely and with very little risk of injury. Tai Chi students enjoy improved balance, stronger muscles, better endurance and increased flexibility as well as reduced stress and overall well-being. During Tai Chi classes, you'll stretch most of the muscles in your body while you increase body awareness and work on proper breathing and internal energy flow. Accurate, repeated practice of flowing Tai Chi movements helps to retrain posture, loosen stiff joints and encourage circulation throughout the body. Standing practices help you learn to align your body while you focus on internal sensations.A slow introduction to the elements of Tai Chi will prepare you to learn various exercises and sequence them together to enjoy the full health benefits of this valuable martial art. Our Tai Chi classes are taught by experienced, qualified instructors and are suitable for people of all fitness levels. Even if you're not in great shape, or you have health problems, the gentle, low-impact motions and concentrated internal focus of Tai Chi martial arts moves can help stabilize your body, mind and spirit, and build a foundation for a more balanced life. Tai Chi Class Schedule with Elena KadigrovaElena Kadigrova is 5 times European Champion. She is a World Medalist in Kung Fu, in Forms, Weapons and Sparring. Elena is a Black belt in a Combat Kung Fu. She also has more than 10 years of teaching and training Kung Fu, Forms with Weapons and Sparring for all ages in the United States. Prior to coming to US Elena was for 4 years a Wushu Teacher at the Children’s Sport School (Berdyansk, Ukraine). She was Awarded a rank of the “International Degree Athlete in Wushu” by Ministry of Culture and Sport of the Ukraine.

    Ranking:

    • Member of National Ukrainian Wushu Taolu Team from 1991 to 2000.
    • Bronze medalist at World Wushu Championship in Women’s Gunshu (Cudgel) Baltimore (USA-1995).
    • 1st place in Women’s Duilian (Set Sparing) at European Wushu Cup Moscow (Russia-1993).
    • 1st place in Women’s Chanquan (Long fist), Jianshu (Straight sword), Duilian (Set Sparing) and Traditional Fist at European Wushu Cup Istanbul (Turkey-1995).
    • 1st place in a Women’s Taolu Program at International Wushu Championship Cairo (Egypt-1995).
    • 1st place in a Women’s Traditional Weapon at European Wushu Championship Rome (Italy-1996).
    • 1st place in Women’s Chanquan (Long fist), Jianshu (Straight sword) in European Wushu Championship (Greece-1998).
    • 1st place in Women’s Taolu Program at International Wushu Cup Bergamo (Italy-1998).
    • 1st places in Women’s Individual Taolu Program at National Ukrainian Wushu Competitions 1991-2000
    1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
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6:30 pm
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7:30 pm
8:00 pm

Private lessons are available from 7am until 10pm, 7 days a week. Private Lessons are $80 per hour

  • Adult (14 years & older) group classes are up to 8 hours per calendar week for $140 per month.
  • Children (10-14 years old) group classes are up to 4.5 hours per calendar week for $140 per month.
  • Children (5-10 years old) group classes are up to 3 hours per calendar week for $140 per month.
  • Children (3.5-5 years old) group classes are up to 3 hours per calendar week for $100 per month